Fa19 ITLS-6760-LO1 Syllabus

_Syllabus_Fall_8_19_19__6760.pdf

Fall 2019

ITLS 6760: Grant Writing

 

Instructor: Mary Ann Parlin, Ph.D.

E-Mail: maryann.parlin@usu.edu

Phone: 435-760-2084

Course Overview

The Grant Writing course introduces students to the different aspects of grant writing such as identifying a need or research problem, aligning problems with funding sources and possible partners, reading request for proposals, developing project plans, writing coherent, evidence-based, and interesting grant proposals, developing evaluation plans and budgets, review proposals, and managing grants. Assignments throughout the course will accumulate into a formalized grant proposal as the final project. During the proposal writing stages students will participate as reviewers as well as writers.

 

Course Objectives

 

Course Learning Outcomes

IDEA Center Learning Objectives

 

 

Understand the grant writing process and the origins of funding monies.

 Objective 3. Apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

 

Objective 4: Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

Identify research problems and needs. Design appropriate project plans based on these needs.

 Objective 3. Apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

Objective 4: Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

Objective 9: Apply skills to find and use resources for answering questions or solving problems

Locate, analyze, and interpret requests for proposals (RFP’s)

Objective 3. Apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

Objective 4: Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

Objective 9: Apply skills to find and use resources for answering questions or solving problems

Objective 11: Analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view

Organize and write a coherent and convincing grant proposal, including most of the commonly required components

 Objective 3. Apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

Objective 4: Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

Objective 8: Develop skill in expressing myself orally or in writing

Understand the layout and purpose of evaluation plans and budgets and their connection to your proposal narrative

 Objective 3. Apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

Objective 4: Developing specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

Review grant proposals and provide constructive comments

 Objective 3. Apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

Objective 4: Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

Objective 11: Analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view

Take appropriate action after your proposal has been accepted or rejected

 Objective 3. Apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

Objective 4: Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course


Course Format

Delivery of this course is online, through the Canvas learning management system. Each week of the course begins and ends on a Monday.

You can expect the following from the instructor:

Because this course is online, you will be doing a fair amount of independent reading and need to be a self-motivated and independent learner. Please keep up with the readings and assignments.

The process of preparing a grant proposal can be quite labor intensive and, by extension, so is this course. You should expect a fair amount of academic research and writing.

 

Required Textbooks

The Only Grant-Writing Book You’ll Ever Need (FOURTH Edition) / Ellen Karsh and Arlen Sue Fox.

Publication Date: April 8, 2014 | ISBN-10: 0465058930 | ISBN-13: 978-0465058938 | Edition: Fourth Edition

The library has several online versions.
The Only Grant Writing Book You’ll Ever Need

** It is possible to use a previous edition of the text books, though I would prefer your book be within one edition (e.g., 3rd instead of 4th). There are some differences in page numbers and lessons, so PLEASE REFER TO THE LESSON NAME (rather than page numbers or lesson number) WHEN DETERMINING WHAT TO READ. WHEN IN DOUBT, PLEASE CONTACT ME!

The course is built around readings from this textbooks and we will cover the ENTIRE book so please get it right away or you may have trouble completing the course and assignments. Textbooks are available via the USU Bookstore or from online sources like Amazon (where they are often cheaper). Get the Paperback Version! These readings will be supplemented by additional materials found on the Canvas Course Site.

 

Course Requirements

Class Participation (15%)

Class participation consists of being an active and thoughtful contributor to the class discussion forum. In general, this means that you write a post of your own responding on the discussion prompt and respond to at least two of your classmates (or me) in a substantive way. Please follow appropriate netiquette when contributing to the online discussions (http://blogs.onlineeducation.touro.edu/15-rules-netiquette-online-discussion-boards/). 

Problem Statement: Part I (0%), Part II (10%), & Part III (15%)

Part I

You will submit a draft problem statement that articulates a need for funding in 1,000 words (references do not count towards this word count). A problem statement is a compelling description of need that articulates why you need money from the funding agency. For this assignment, you must identify an educational (or research) need and present it in a way that convinces your audience. Although this part is ungraded, it is mandatory. More details and examples, as well as the rubric I will use to grade your problem statements, can be found on the respective assignment pages in Canvas.

Part II

You will engage in a peer review process. This is a can be a VERY clunky process in Canvas, so if it is troublesome, go ahead and sign up to peer review someone else's problem statement and then plan on exchanging copies by e-mail.

Part III

You will submit a revised version of your problem statement, taking into account the feedback you received in the peer review process. Please note that you will need to include a description of how you incorporated the feedback you received and a self-evaluation using the rubric found on the assignments page for Part III of the problem statement.

Funding Source and Impact Statement (10%)

For this assignment, you will need to: 1) provide a list of at least one funding source and a description of why this is a good fit for your proposal and 2) prepare an impact statement (1,000 words or less) that describes how your proposal’s goals and objectives align with those of the funding source. Successful proposals address problems closely aligned with the goals and objectives of a funding source (this alignment is also known as the intellectual merit of a proposal). More detail on the assignment and an example can be found on Canvas.

Compliance Matrix (5%)

Create a compliance matrix based on the Request For Proposals (RFP) of the funding agency you selected. A compliance matrix is a list of requirements you pull out of the RFP one by one so that each line contains one requirement. This makes it easier to track all the requirements and make sure you have fulfilled every single one of them in your proposal. If you cannot follow directions you are not getting the grant, it is as simple as that. Thus, the compliance matrix is a tool for you, the proposal writer, to keep track of all the requirements from the funding agency. NOTE that not all funding agencies have RFPs. Sometimes you have to pull the requirements from a website. Please note the URL in this case. More details and examples, as well as the rubric I will use to grade your matrix, can be found on the respective assignment pages in Canvas.

Logic Model (10%)

Pick the logic model that makes most sense to your project or create your own that is tailored to your specific situation. The point of creating a logic model is that it demonstrates a logical flow between the components of your proposed work. It visualizes the connections between the different parts of your work and helps you to ensure that these parts are aligned well. For example, your objectives should be related to the outcomes of your proposed work. Some grant proposals are required to include a logic model.

Draft Proposal (0%)

The draft proposal combines some of the components you have already completed (problem statement, impact statement, and logic model) with any additional information your funding agency is asking for (budget, evaluation section, etc.) into a coherent grant proposal. For the purposes of this assignment, if your funding agency requires less than the components listed above, you should submit a generic grant application: Common Grant Application

 being sure to complete the following:
Section II: A 3-4 (items 1-2 are optional); B 1-5
Section III: A 1
Section IV: budget

Before submitting your draft proposal (including the relevant RFP or equivalent URL and your compliance matrix) please evaluate it against the Grant Proposal Self-Assessment Tool that will be used by your reviewers and the Final Proposal Rubric that will be used by me when grading your final submission. Please note that while this portion of the assignment is ungraded, it is mandatory.

Proposal Reviews (15%)

You will engage in a peer review process. This is a can be a VERY clunky process in Canvas, so if it is troublesome, go ahead and sign up to peer review someone else's problem statement and then plan on exchanging copies by e-mail.

 Please note that reviewing is very time consuming, so start early! Please use the Grant Proposal Self-Assessment Tool's review criteria where applicable AND the RFP. Please write a constructive review of at least 500 words but not more than 1,000. Once you have completed your review, evaluate it based on the rubric found on the Proposal Review assignment page on Canvas before submitting your review and the completed grant-proposal self-assessment tool. More details about the assignment and a fillable PDF form for the Grant Proposal Self-Assessment Tool (Grant SAT) can be found on Canvas.

Final Proposal (20%)

You will submit your final grant proposal, being sure to incorporate peer review feedback to improve your proposal. In a separate "response document" write a response to each reviewer comment indicating what changes (and where in the document) you have made in your proposal to address the reviewer comments.  

 

Course Overview

Dates                             Week               Topic

8/27/18-9/4/18             Week 1            Course Introduction (Labor Day on 9/3)

9/4/18-9/10/18             Week 2            The Grant Writing Process

9/10/18-9/17/18           Week 3            Needs, Goals, and Objectives

9/17/18-9/24/18           Week 4            Finding Funding Resources/Finding Information

9/24/18-10/1/18           Week 5            Aligning Problems with Funding Sources                        

10/1/18-10/8/18           Week 6            RFP, Proposal Checklist, Timeline, Outline

10/8/18-10/15/18         Week 7            Logic Model

10/15/18-10/22/18       Week 8            Starting the Writing Process (Fall Break on 10/20)

10/22/18-10/29/18       Week 9            Program Planning and Evidence-Based Design

10/32918-11/5/18         Week 10          Evaluation

11/5/18-11/12/18         Week 11          The Budget & Sustainability Plan

11/12/18-11/19/18       Week 12          Abstract, Letters, and Additional Materials

11/19/18-11/26/18       Week 13          Proposal Submission and Review (Thanksgiving)

11/26/18-12/3/18         Week 14          Post-Proposal Submission

12/3/18-12/10/18         Week 15          Class Wrap-Up

12/10/18                      Finals               Final Grant Proposal Due

* Please see the modules in Canvas for course readings and other materials. I reserve the right to alter readings up to two weeks in advance.  

 

Grading

Your grade will be based on the university grading scale:

A         100-93%, 

    A-        92-90%            

B+       89-87%

    B         86-83%,

B-        82-80%

    C+       79-77%

C         76-73%

    C-        72-70%

D         69-60%        

    F          59-0%

 

 


Please note that to earn an A- or A grade, the assignment must go beyond the minimum expected in terms of quality (e.g. insight, creativity, analysis, thoroughness, synthesis).

Without exception, plagiarized work results in an F and automatically revokes the opportunity to redo that assignment.

Assignments that are handed in past the due date cannot be redone.

All assignments need to be submitted through Canvas Assignments or they will not be accepted.

Assignments that clearly do not follow directions are returned without review.

If you wish to discuss a grade, hand in a written explanation of your argument and arrange for a private (online or face to face) meeting or phone call. Except for unusual circumstances, no appeal for an individual assignment or project will be considered more than two weeks after the grade has been posted. 

 

UNIVERSITY POLICIES & PROCEDURES

Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibilities

Academic freedom is the right to teach, study, discuss, investigate, discover, create, and publish freely. Academic freedom protects the rights of faculty members in teaching and of students in learning. Freedom in research is fundamental to the advancement of truth. Faculty members are entitled to full freedom in teaching, research, and creative activities, subject to the limitations imposed by professional responsibility. Faculty Code Policy #403 further defines academic freedom and professional responsibilities.

Academic Integrity – "The Honor System"

Each student has the right and duty to pursue his or her academic experience free of dishonesty. The Honor System is designed to establish the higher level of conduct expected and required of all Utah State University students.
The Honor Pledge: To enhance the learning environment at Utah State University and to develop student academic integrity, each student agrees to the following Honor Pledge:
"I pledge, on my honor, to conduct myself with the foremost level of academic integrity."
A student who lives by the Honor Pledge is a student who does more than not cheat, falsify, or plagiarize. A student who lives by the Honor Pledge:

Academic Dishonesty

The instructor of this course will take appropriate actions in response to Academic Dishonesty, as defined the University’s Student Code.  Acts of academic dishonesty include but are not limited to:

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is defined by the Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Commission as any "unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature." If you feel you are a victim of sexual harassment, you may talk to or file a complaint with the Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Office located in Old Main, Room 161, or call the AA/EEO Office at (435) 797-1266.

Withdrawal Policy and "I" Grade Policy

Students are required to complete all courses for which they are registered by the end of the semester. In some cases, a student may be unable to complete all of the coursework because of extenuating circumstances, but not due to poor performance or to retain financial aid. The term ‘extenuating’ circumstances includes: (1) incapacitating illness which prevents a student from attending classes for a minimum period of two weeks, (2) a death in the immediate family, (3) financial responsibilities requiring a student to alter a work schedule to secure employment, (4) change in work schedule as required by an employer, or (5) other emergencies deemed appropriate by the instructor.

Students with Disabilities

Students with ADA-documented physical, sensory, emotional or medical impairments may be eligible for reasonable accommodations. Veterans may also be eligible for services. All accommodations are coordinated through the Disability Resource Center (DRC). Please contact the DRC prior to or as early in the semester as possible. Alternate formats for course content are available with advanced notice. 
Contacting the Disability Resource Center (DRC):

Disability related resources for current students:

Diversity Statement

Regardless of intent, careless or ill-informed remarks can be offensive and hurtful to others and detract from the learning climate. If you feel uncomfortable in a classroom due to offensive language or actions by an instructor or student(s) regarding ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation, contact:

You can learn about your student rights by visiting:
The Code of Policies and Procedures for Students at Utah State University: http://www.usu.edu/studentservices/studentcode/

Grievance Process

Students who feel they have been unfairly treated may file a grievance through the channels and procedures described in the Student Code: Article VII. Grievances.

Full details for USU Academic Policies and Procedures can be found at: